All posts filed under: vintage recipes

Sweet (red) Cabbage, Miss Mary Bobo Style

Antique in nature for sure, this recipe can be prepared sans the bacon fat and be just as easily delicious. As my personal palate begins to gear more towards the vegetable orientation, finding dated ways of preparing them has become one of my passions. Everyone probably everywhere says, “eat your greens” to which I like to add,” and your reds, purples, deep oranges and yellows”.  The darker the vegetable, quite often the deeper the health benefits range. Sweet (red) Cabbage served warm or cold can surpass any seasonal notoriety  that its peers may suffer from. Yes, this is one of the superfoods y’all and it is tasty when prepared with care. Alone or paired with bacon wrapped pork roast, you can rest assured that this dish has pleased those presented with it on tables for millennia. Quite literally, millennia. With terrific nutritional benefits, my favorite form of pickled cabbage called kim chi (served raw) is a Korean diet staple. Our ancestors and their love of cabbage runs deep, and it was cross culturally common. It is praised for …

rinktum ditty: tomato cheddar sauce on toast

With the sounds of grandfather clocks ticking and water boiling, the past is where is I find my inspiration when it comes to nourishment. Food is love. True love being real food made the way our matriarchs of days past prepared it, soup to nuts. From fetching the chicken, breaking its neck and churning their own butter, these woman were frontiersman in their own right. We have oh so much to learn from them! Let us leave the world of over-processed foods  and  venture into the past where people practiced patience and celebrated a hard day’s work with food made from love.  I would like to present a recipe for my namesake, rinktum ditty. A simple yet staple item in America’s early history and on many dinner tables around the country, its origins are mysteriously uncertain. It is something my great grandmother with her Swiss roots, served as appetizers at supper parties. My German great-grandfather shared in the comfort of this dish as well, likely served by his mother. His love for tomato sauce in general gives likely cause to support the fact that my great …