All posts tagged: whole foods

Whipped Cashew Cream, My Newest Luxury Condiment Obsession

GP featured it in her latest book of yummy eats, It’s All Easy. It has been available on snazzy connoisseur deli shelves with the sadly added preservatives for years. Easily whipped up after the soaking process, this version is a simple and wholesome delight. An accoutrement with endless creative options or with fresh fruit as a dessert plate this recipe impresses me every time. I use Jacobson Sea Salt (based in Oregon) as my constant companion in the kitchen, I never would advise using sugary fake syrup – invest in the real deal or use a suitable substitute  and enjoy this new way of savoring the cashew. Cheers! Whipped Cashew Cream 8 oz unsalted cashews, soaked in water for several hours to soften pinch of course sea salt 1/2 water 1 tablespoon real maple syrup, or agave nectar small dash of pure vanilla extract *Blending until smooth and achieving the desired amount of whipped-ness, refrigerate.

The Pickle: Not Just a Fancy Cucumber or a Girl’s First Lovah

The art of pickling goes as far back as the bible. Developed out of the need for preservation of food, it has become woven into almost every aspect of our condiment repertoire. Native to India, the cucumber was widely believed to have healing properties. George Washington was rumored to have several varieties at his disposal. I personally believe there is a link between his hemp use and the craving of pickled products. A pregnant woman is rumored to crave pickles as well, hmm. They are ever-present in my older cookbooks as a staple appetizer and ‘tv snack’. I plan on devoting an entire entry on these so called ‘tv snacks’ of the 1950s. I digress. I used a Peruvian cucumber in these photos. Happy Pickling people! Pickles 1 large smashed garlic glove 1 small cucumber, sliced into thin rounds 1 tablespoon sugar 2 tablespoons vinegar (apple cider) smudge of salt to taste Combine all ingredients  except the garlic & cucumber slices in a pot of water (about 1/2 cup), once boiling remove from heat and pour onto the garlic and cucumber. Let pickle …

Screaming, Screwing and Baking The Best Biscuits EVAH

Sometimes you want to scream, throw something, screw madly or create. It thunders loudly where I sit now, the sky ominously pointing the finger at days ahead to be spent indoors. How rude, and after the day I am having thus far! In a concerted effort to tame the beast which is my monkey mind, I am opting to bake. Falling into the category of creativity, baking bread is about as rote of a process I can imagine. All of that Dr. Seuss like waiting. Waiting for the dough to rise, punching the dough, waiting again for the dough to rise, waiting for the dough to bake and so forth and so on. There is a certain equanimity to it, relaxing the mind from worry. Requiring Buddha like patience, baking a dramatically good loaf of homemade bread will attract everyone within sniffing distance like a bear to honey. I  am certainly  not advocating gorging on mass amounts of carbs. However surprising  a loved one, friend or neighbor with a gift of your fresh baked goodness will polish your …

Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House Cookbook

  Let me begin by admitting that Miss Mary Bobo’s Boarding House Cookbook is my personal bible. I cannot complete a conversation about food without making reference to her magnificence. Miss Mary Bobo and her husband Jack took over the Salmon boarding house in 1908 from a retired physician in Lynchburg, Tennessee. Aside from her rather homely looks, Miss Mary demonstrated a fearless approach of farm to table food. Her recipes are as nourishing to the body as they are to the senses. A bowl of Miss Mary’s soup is as soothing as it is a gift from the culinary gods. A midday ‘supper’ is still served here daily, featuring the vegetables grown in the dual gardens on the premises. In a town famous for the Jack Daniel Distillery the county is actually dry, consequently Miss Mary’s only serves sweet iced tea and water. Regardless of this fact, many of her recipes famously include Jack Daniel’s whiskey. The vibe at Miss Mary’s house is in perfect retrograde. Rocking chairs line the front porch inviting guests …

Adventures in Good Cooking and The Art of Carving in the Home, by Duncan Hines

“Tested recipes of unusual dishes from America’s favorite eating places.” I am lucky enough to have the 1953 version or the 25th printing out of Bowling Green, Kentucky. Mr. Hines (March 26, 1880- March 15,1959) was born in Kentucky to a father who was a confederate soldier. Because his mother died while at such a young age, Duncan was raised by his grandmother. This fun fact I like to imagine is exactly why he was so accomplished in the kitchen. Coupled with his early career in writing it wouldn’t have taken a soothsayer to predict his wild success. More than just a name on the adult-easy-bake-mix we are all accused of succumbing to on occasion, this man was molded by his grandmother  – therefore breaking all barriers of his and her cooking approaches. Ground breaking, well; to me anyhow.  As luck would have it, Mr. Hines was known for visiting the Midwest during the final years of his life and thanks to the bibliophile gods, my copy is signed. A most glorious treasure indeed! Not a coffee …

rinktum ditty: tomato cheddar sauce on toast

With the sounds of grandfather clocks ticking and water boiling, the past is where is I find my inspiration when it comes to nourishment. Food is love. True love being real food made the way our matriarchs of days past prepared it, soup to nuts. From fetching the chicken, breaking its neck and churning their own butter, these woman were frontiersman in their own right. We have oh so much to learn from them! Let us leave the world of over-processed foods  and  venture into the past where people practiced patience and celebrated a hard day’s work with food made from love.  I would like to present a recipe for my namesake, rinktum ditty. A simple yet staple item in America’s early history and on many dinner tables around the country, its origins are mysteriously uncertain. It is something my great grandmother with her Swiss roots, served as appetizers at supper parties. My German great-grandfather shared in the comfort of this dish as well, likely served by his mother. His love for tomato sauce in general gives likely cause to support the fact that my great …